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The Badger Conference released an announcement Sunday regarding sportsmanship entering the 2019 fall sports season and for the 2019-20 school year.

The release:

“Every August brings the excitement of a new season of high school athletics. The athletes, coaches, parents and fans are eager to get into the stands and support their athletes. The Badger Conference is asking for your assistance in providing positive sportsmanship at our events.

“The involvement of our students in athletics and activities contributes to the development of their value system. Trustworthiness, citizenship, caring, fairness and respect are lifetime values that are taught through educationally-based activities and are fundamental principles of good character.

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“With these principles, the spirit of competition thrives, fueled by honest rivalry, courteous relations, and grateful acceptance of the results.

“The Badger Conference has made a commitment to promote good sportsmanship by student-athletes, coaches and spectators at all athletic events. Profanity, degrading remarks and intimidating actions directed at officials or competitors will not be tolerated and are grounds for removal from the event site.

“The score from any contest is generally forgotten over time, but the actions of players, coaches and spectators are remembered. The next time you attend a high school event, please remember to sport a winning attitude and support our athletes, coaches, game officials, and event workers.”

The Badger Conference includes 16 schools, eight in the Badger North and eight in the Badger South. 

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Jon Masson covers high school sports for the Wisconsin State Journal. He has covered a variety of sports — including the Green Bay Packers and Wisconsin men's and women's basketball and volleyball — since he first came to the State Journal in 1999.