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On this week's "Center Stage" political podcast -- click the orange play button above to listen -- Milfred and Hands look back at monstrous vetoes from Wisconsin's past, and ahead to further constitutional limits in light of Gov. Tony Evers' latest vetoes.

Evers used his remaining partial veto powers to "undelete" language lawmakers had removed from the state budget. That's being called the "zombie" veto because he brought dead language back to life. Evers then combined some of the numbers he resuscitated with other numbers in the budget to increase spending by tens of millions of dollars -- without legislative approval.

Some lawmakers want to ban governors from vetoing higher spending into law, which makes sense to our editorial board members. Our editorial led the fight to ban the "Frankenstein" veto a decade ago, stopping governors from stitching together unrelated words across pages of the state budget to create new law from scratch. And before that, our editorial board recommended voters support a constitutional amendment banning the "Vanna White" veto, in which governors had vetoed around individual letters to spell new words in the state budget.

"Center Stage with Milfred and Hands" is the State Journal's weekly podcast from the sensible center of Wisconsin politics, featuring editorial page editor Scott Milfred and political cartoonist Phil Hands, half of the Wisconsin State Journal editorial board. 

Follow or subscribe to "Center Stage" on iTunesSoundCloudStitcher or Google Play. Or to listen to past episodes of "Center Stage," go to the podcast's website on Madison.com by clicking here.

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Scott Milfred has been the editorial page editor for the Wisconsin State Journal since 2005, and previously covered the Wisconsin statehouse. Milfred and his editorial page team were finalists for the Pulitzer Prize in 2008 for editorial writing.