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Another side effect from COVID-19: hair loss
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Another side effect from COVID-19: hair loss

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Covid Cuts 05-09222020154212 (copy)

Kismet salon Kristin Knechtges cuts and styles the hair of client Debbie Carlson in Madison in September.

Hair loss — sometimes seen after a heart attack, car crash or childbirth — appears to be on the rise among people who have recovered from COVID-19, according to a UW Health dermatologist.

Dr. Apple Bodemer said she started seeing more cases of hair loss last summer, with an increase in the fall as COVID-19 surged in Dane County.

“Prior to COVID-19, I was seeing two to four hair loss patients per month,” Bodemer said in a statement. “Recently, I have been seeing up to five or six a day.”

Hair loss associated with physical and emotional stress from COVID-19 is called telogen effluvium, which commonly occurs after stressors such as heart attacks, car crashes, childbirth or the loss of loved ones, she said.

When the body is under stress, hair growth is put on hold, Bodemer said. Typically, it starts to regrow about four to six months later, when shedding occurs. Hair loss up to 50 percent is not uncommon, she said.

Hair typically grows back in six to 12 months, Bodemer said.

She said she talks to patients about doing mindfulness and taking supplements that help support the adrenal glands, to better handle physical aspects of stress. Rogaine is an option but can take several months to kick in.

Long-term hair loss can also be caused by thyroid disease, iron deficiency or other undiagnosed medical conditions.

'Every aspect of our lives has been turned on its head': The COVID-19 pandemic one year on

A year into a once-in-a-century pandemic, Madison and Wisconsin continue to grapple with a virus that's killed thousands, destroyed businesses, upended school and changed nearly all aspects of everyday life.

It's been 12 months of grief, shutdowns, reopenings, protective measures, partisan fighting, lawsuits and loss. And now, hope. 

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“Truly every aspect of our lives has been turned on its head,” said Malia Jones, a UW-Madison infectious disease epidemiologist. 

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"If you would have told me last March that we'd be virtual for a year, I'd never, ever would have believed it."

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"We’re used to taking whatever comes through the door," said nurse Maria Hanson, who started journaling about the pandemic soon after treating the patient.

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"It’s a risk vs. reward thing and I risk my life to save others," said Brandon Jones, who always worried about bringing the virus home to his wife and two kids.

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“Usually a funeral is a major step in understanding that a life was lived and the person is now gone,” he said. “If families don’t get that, it’s just really hard.”

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Rev. Marcus Allen knew what bringing everyone together could do for their spiritual and mental health. But each time he considered reopening the church, COVID-19 cases surged.

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"I was getting my work done from 9 p.m. to 3 a.m. every day," she said.

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“Reporting the death counts out day after day was draining,” she said. “It felt like I was announcing a funeral every day.”

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A year into a once-in-a-century pandemic, Madison and Wisconsin continue to grapple with a virus that's killed thousands, destroyed businesses…

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COVID-19 changed nearly everything about our world, even how we see it. Here are some of the State Journal's top images of the pandemic.

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