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Poor marks for flu nasal spray prompted officials on Wednesday to recommend not using the spray but get a flu shot instead for the 2016-2017 flu season.

The Wisconsin Department of Health Services said data from the Centers for Disease Control and Protection was disappointing, but there should be plenty of flu vaccine for the upcoming season.

"We expect there will be enough of the injectable vaccine available for the 2016-17 season, so everyone six months and older can protect themselves and their loved ones against the flu," said State Health Officer Karen McKeown.

The CDC's data on the effectiveness of nasal spray, known by the trade name Flu Mist, among children ages two to 17 during the 2015-16 season found no effective benefit from the spray could be measured, while injectable vaccine was found to be very effective in preventing flu in the children's age group.

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The CDC's Advisory Committee on Immunication Practices voted to recommend live attentuated influenza vaccine (LAIV), or nasal spray, not be used after data showed poor or relatively low effectiveness of the spray from 2013 through 2016.

During the 2015-16 flu season, about 1,800 people with the flu were hospitalized in Wisconsin. The season peaked in March of 2016.

Vaccine recommendations for the 2016-17 season will be made by the CDC in late summer or early fall.

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