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A Kentucky judge has been suspended with pay following testimony that he pressured a lawyer practicing in his court to support his reelection campaign. The Paducah Sun reports the Kentucky Judicial Conduct Commission voted 3-2 on Friday to suspend 42nd Judicial Circuit Judge Jamie Jameson. The daylong hearing included testimony from an attorney that Jameson repeatedly asked to support his reelection campaign. Jameson was also accused of unbecoming conduct. The panel viewed a number of videos showing Jameson’s courtroom demeanor and use of his contempt power. Jameson testified on his own behalf, at one point telling commissioners they were being used for political purposes.

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Salman Rushdie's agent says the author is “on the road to recovery” two days after suffering serious injuries in a stabbing at a lecture in upstate New York. The announcement followed news that the lauded writer was removed from a ventilator Saturday and able to talk and joke. Andrew Wylie continued to caution that although Rushdie’s “condition is headed in the right direction,” his recovery would be a long process. The 75-year-old suffered a damaged liver and severed nerves in an arm and an eye, Wylie had previously said, and was likely to lose the injured eye. Twenty-four-year-old Hadi Matar pleaded not guilty in the attack.

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Police in Las Vegas say former NFL running back Marshawn Lynch was asleep and smelled of alcohol when he was found in his damaged sports car this week and arrested on suspicion of driving while intoxicated. Lynch’s attorneys responded Thursday with a statement saying Lynch was in a parked car, not driving, and a DUI charge won't stick. The arresting officer says police found markings suggesting Lynch’s black Shelby GT500 hit sidewalks before stopping in an industrial part of downtown Las Vegas. The 7:30 a.m. Tuesday arrest came after the Seattle Seahawks announced Monday that Lynch had been hired as a team broadcast special correspondent. In 12 NFL seasons, Lynch also played for the Buffalo Bills and Oakland Raiders.

A private prison company has agreed to settle a federal lawsuit over a Tennessee inmate’s killing. The resolution comes after a magistrate judge last month received national attention for ordering the inmate’s attorney to delete fiery tweets about CoreCivic and stop publicly commenting about the company and the case. A CoreCivic spokesperson says the settlement terms are confidential. Plaintiff's attorney Daniel Horwitz says he remains unable to comment due to the gag order on the case surrounding Trousdale Turner Correctional Center. Horwitz is representing G. Marie Newby, the mother of Terry Childress. Court records show Childress died in February 2021 after his Trousdale cellmate assaulted him.

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The judge in penalty trial of Florida school shooter Nikolas Cruz will soon decide whether the jury will be told about some brain exams his lawyers had conducted on him. His attorneys this week will tell Circuit Judge Elizabeth Scherer that she should permit the tests be shown in their upcoming presentation. They say the tests bolster their claim that Cruz suffers from fetal alcohol syndrome. The prosecution says the tests are junk science and should not be shown to the jury. Cruz has pleaded guilty to murdering 17 at Parkland's Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in 2018. His ongoing trial is to determine whether he is sentenced to death or life without parole.

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Some of the rioters who stormed the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021, are trying to profit from their participation in the deadly insurrection while they face the legal consequences for their crimes. In some cases, rioters have used the attack as a platform for promoting their business endeavors, political aspirations or social media profiles. Many of those charged have used websites and crowdfunding platforms to raise money after their arrests. Efforts to capitalize on the riot haven’t gone over well with federal prosecutors or the judges who've sentenced more than 200 riot defendants so far. Prosecutors often cite the profit-chasing activities in seeking tougher punishments.

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As more details emerge about the Georgia investigation into possible illegal attempts to influence the 2020 election, high-profile lawyers are getting involved. Former President Donald Trump has hired prominent Atlanta criminal defense attorney Drew Findling, who’s best known for representing rap stars. Trump's former White House counsel, Don McGahn, has been in federal court in Atlanta as part of the legal team fighting a subpoena for U.S. Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C. Legal experts say hiring a lawyer is the right choice for anyone who has dealings with the special grand jury or suspects he may be a subject or target of the investigation. No one's been charged with a crime in the investigation. Trump and Graham have denied any wrongdoing,

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As part of an effort to keep illegal drugs and other contraband out of state prisons, New York is taking away one of the few pleasures of life behind bars. It will no longer let people send inmates care packages from home. The state began phasing in the new policy last month. Friends and family will no longer be allowed to deliver packages in person during prison visits. They also won’t be allowed to mail boxes of goodies unless they come direct from third-party vendors. New York had been one of the few states that still allowed families to send packages to inmates from home.

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Lt. Gov. Josh Green is the Democratic Party’s candidate to be Hawaii’s next governor. Green defeated U.S. Rep. Kaiali’i Kahele and former Hawaii first lady Vicky Cayetano in Saturday’s primary election. Green has served as second-in-command to Hawaii Gov. David Ige for the past four years. Ige has served two four-year terms and is not eligible to run for re-election. The winner of the Democratic primary would be the favorite to win the general election in the liberal state. Former Lt. Gov. James R. “Duke” Aiona won the Republican primary for governor, defeating mixed martial arts championship fighter B.J. Penn.

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The North Carolina Highway Patrol says a Department of Transportation worker was killed when a vehicle struck her as she directed traffic around a fallen tree. A man was later arrested and charged with fleeing the scene. The patrol says 60-year-old Anna Bradshaw worked in DOT's Wilson County maintenance office. A trooper says she was holding a sign Friday morning along U.S. Highway 264 Alternate when she was struck by a passenger car, but the driver ultimately left. The patrol says Jamari Marquis Powell of Bailey was taken into custody late Friday and charged with felony hit and run.

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The Los Angeles Police Department has ended its investigation into Anne Heche’s car accident, when the actor crashed into a Los Angeles home on Aug. 5. The 53-year-old is brain dead and on life support, pending evaluation for organ donation. The department announced Friday that there would be no further investigation. Detectives looking into the crash had said narcotics were found in a blood sample taken from Heche. She has been hospitalized at a Los Angeles burn center.

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Author Salman Rushdie has been taken off a ventilator and is able to talk, a day after being stabbed as he prepared to give a lecture. Rushdie's agent confirmed information contained in a tweet by another author Saturday. Earlier in the day, the man accused in the attack in upstate New York pleaded not guilty to attempted murder and assault charges. A judge ordered Hadi Matar held without bail after the district attorney told her Matar took steps to purposely put himself in position to harm Rushdie. Rushdie, the renowned author of “The Satanic Verses” remains hospitalized with serious injuries.

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Three Arizona parents have been arrested after trying to force their way onto an elementary school campus to protect their children during a lockdown. Police in the Phoenix suburb of El Mirage say the school was locked down Friday after an armed man was seen trying to get inside. Police say they were getting ready to reunite families when the confrontation with parents escalated. Police Lt. Jimmy Chavez says a man being arrested dropped a gun, and a man and woman who tried to free him were stunned with a Taser. The scene at Thompson Ranch Elementary School came nearly three months after officers in Uvalde, Texas, failed to act as a gunman killed two teachers and 19 students.

A man is facing assault and weapons charges after allegedly attacking three people with a machete at a sporting goods store in Long Island, New York. Police say the attack occurred at a Dick's Sporting Goods store in Patchogue, about 30 miles east of New York City. Treyvius Tunstall allegedly asked to buy rifles but walked away after he was asked to provide identification. Authorities say he then slashed an employee and struck two other people in the parking lot. Police apprehended Tunstall nearby. He pleaded not guilty at a court appearance Saturday to assault and weapons counts and was ordered held on $400,000 cash bail.

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R. Kelly’s federal trial that starts Monday in Chicago is in many ways a do-over of his child pornography trial in 2008 in state court. At that trial 14 years ago, jurors acquitted the singer on charges that he produced a video of himself having sex with a girl no older than 14. But a big difference between that trial and the one starting in a federal courthouse in Chicago is that prosecutors say the female in the video will testify this time. Among the charges Kelly faces is that he rigged the 2008 trial by paying off and threatening the girl to ensure she didn't testify. The woman is now in her 30s. Four other accusers are also slated to testify.

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The white woman whose accusations prompted the lynching of Emmett Till in 1955 talks in a memoir about getting preferential treatment from Mississippi authorities soon after the killing. Some wonder whether Carolyn Bryant Donham is still being protected decades later. A prosecutor says grand jurors recently looked at the evidence and decided against indicting the woman in Till's abduction and death. Critics contend the decision was wrong. And some say authorities have been careful to protect the white woman ever since the killing happened. It's unclear whether grand jurors will ever consider the case again. But a retired FBI agent says new evidence is still possible.

Dutch financial prosecutors say they have detained a man suspected of involvement in “concealing criminal financial flows and facilitating money laundering” through the virtual currency mixer Tornado Cash. The financial prosecution service FIOD said in a statement released Friday that the 29-year-old man was arrested Aug. 10 in Amsterdam. The suspect’s identity was not released, in line with Dutch privacy regulations. Mixing services combine various digital assets, including potentially illegally obtained funds and legitimately obtained funds, so the holders of illegally obtained assets can obscure the origin of stolen funds.

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Salman Rushdie's agent says the writer is on a ventilator after being stabbed in the neck and abdomen on a western New York stage where he was about to give a lecture. The 75-year-old Rushdie was flown to a hospital and underwent surgery after Friday's stabbing at the Chautauqua Institution. His agent, Andrew Wylie, said the writer had a damaged liver, severed nerves in an arm and an eye he was likely to lose. Rushdie's novel “The Satanic Verses” drew death threats from Iran’s leader in the 1980s, Police arrested the man who attacked the writer and identified him as 24-year-old Hadi Matar of Fairview, New Jersey. Matar's lawyer declined to comment.

Police and court records show the main suspect in the slaying of four Muslim men in Albuquerque has committed regular acts of violence in the six years since he resettled in the United States. Police believe 51-year-old Afghan refugee Muhammad Syed tracked the movements of his victims before ambushing them late at night, motivated seemingly by interpersonal conflicts. He is charged in the deaths of two men and is the primary suspect in the slayings of two others. Syed has denied involvement in the killings. Members of Albuquerque's small, close-knit Muslim community are coming to terms with the idea that maybe they never really knew Syed.

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Deshaun Watson’s apologized before his preseason debut with the Cleveland Browns and then got an earful from opposing fans. Watson apologized “to all the women I have impacted” after being accused by two dozen women of sexual misconduct during massage therapy sessions. He spoke before the team’s exhibition opener, a 24-13 victory against the Jaguars in which Watson was roundly booed during three series of work. Fans in one end zone could be heard chanting vulgarities at Watson during his first drive. The three-time Pro Bowler completed 1 of 5 passes for 7 yards in his first game action since Jan. 3, 2021, with Houston.

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Republican Roy Moore of Alabama has won a defamation lawsuit against a Democratic-aligned super PAC over campaign ads dating to his failed 2017 Senate bid. A jury awarded Roy Moore $8.2 million in damages Friday after finding a Democratic-aligned super PAC made false and defamatory statements with a TV ad during the U.S. Senate race in Alabama. Moore called the ruling a vindication. The Senate Majority PAC argued the ad was substantially true and planned to appeal. Moore is a former judge known for backing public display of the Ten Commandments and hardline stances against same-sex marriage. Misconduct allegations against Moore rocked his 2017 race, which was won by a Democrat.

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Court papers show that the FBI recovered documents  labeled “top secret” from former President Donald Trump’s Mar-a-Lago estate in Florida. The papers released Friday indicate the seized records include some that were marked top secret and also “sensitive compartmented information,” a special category meant to protect the nation’s most important secrets and those that if revealed publicly could cause “exceptionally grave” harm to U.S. interests. The court records did not provide specific details about what information the documents might contain. Trump backed the warrant’s “immediate” release, but contended the government could have had them any time by asking.

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Cleveland Browns quarterback Deshaun Watson has apologized “to all the women I have impacted” after he was accused of sexual misconduct during massage therapy sessions in Texas. Watson is facing a potential year-long suspension. He spoke before Cleveland’s exhibition opener in Jacksonville, his first game since Jan. 3, 2021, with the Houston Texans. Watson was suspended six games by independent arbiter Sue L. Robinson, who concluded he violated the league’s personal conduct policy and lacked remorse. Watson acknowledged he's made mistakes and that there are decisions he would like to have back.

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The Idaho Supreme Court says Idaho’s strict abortion bans will be allowed to take effect while legal challenges play out in court. The state's highest court made the ruling late Friday afternoon. A doctor and a regional Planned Parenthood affiliate sued the state earlier this year over three anti-abortion laws, all of which were designed to take effect this year now that the U.S. Supreme Court has overturned Roe v. Wade. Under the new ruling, a near-total criminalizing all abortions takes effect Aug. 25. The law says anyone performing or assisting with an abortion may be charged with a felony, but physicians can attempt to defend themselves by saying the procedure was necessary to save a life.

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A former candidate for Yakima County commissioner has pleaded guilty and was sentenced to probation for her role in the Jan. 6 insurrection. KIMA-TV reports 50-year-old Lisa Homer pleaded guilty this week to one count of illegally demonstrating inside the U.S. Capitol, a misdemeanor. As part of a plea deal, prosecutors dropped charges of illegally entering the capitol and disorderly conduct. She was sentenced to three years of probation, community service and fines. A report by the FBI Joint Terrorism Task Force says video evidence shows Homer participating in chants led by members of the far-right Proud Boys. Homer, formerly of Yakima, also entered the Capitol Building, according to the report.

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