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Volunteers have restored 51 gravestones of children who lived and died in the late 1800s and early 1900s at the Home for Destitute Children in Vermont's largest city. The small headstones are in the scenic and historic Lakeview Cemetery. According to University of Vermont professor Meghan Cope, the Home for Destitute Children was formed in the 1860s by some middle-class and wealthy women to serve Vermont children orphaned by the Civil War. She says it grew to serve a much broader population of kids later from families in crisis, such as a parent dying, poverty or neglect. Volunteers from the Vermont Old Cemetery Association and the Howard Center reset and cleaned the stones earlier this month.

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Federal officials say an increasing number of fake prescription pills containing potentially deadly fentanyl are helping drive overdose death rates to record levels in the U.S. And officials warn that some of the pills are being manufactured in rainbow colors designed to look like candy. Attorney General Merrick Garland said Tuesday that Drug Enforcement Administration agents are working to crack down on violent drug cartels in Mexico believed to be trafficking the drugs into the U.S. He said that between May and September, the DEA and local police around the country seized more than 10 million fentanyl pills and hundreds of pounds of powder.

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Millennial leaders are rising at the United Nations General Assembly. Shaped by the borderless internet, growing economic inequality and an increasingly dire climate crisis, the Generation Y cohort of presidents, prime ministers, foreign ministers and other “excellencies” is making their mark at the largest gathering of world leaders. This week at the UN offers a glimpse of the latest generation of leaders in power, as a critical mass of them – born generally between 1981 and 1996 – now represent and rule countries in the Americas, Europe, Asia and Africa.

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It’s not every day that a small hamlet in the Missouri Ozarks is in the middle of everything. But that was the case for tiny Wright County, Missouri, on Wednesday as dignitaries from the nation’s capital unveiled a marker designating a spot in the county as the center of population in the U.S. Officials from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the U.S. Census Bureau debuted the red granite marker in Hartville, Missouri. Hartville is the county seat and it's located 14.6 miles from the actual spot. The nation’s population center is calculated every 10 years after the once-a-decade census.

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Detroit is suing the U.S. Census Bureau over population estimates from last year that show the city lost an additional 7,100 residents. The move Tuesday opens another front against the agency in a battle over how Detroit's people have been counted in the past two years. Mayor Mike Duggan says the city wants the Census Bureau to reveal the formula it used to produce its population loss estimates for Detroit. Duggan claims the bureau was going against its own policy by refusing to divulge its formula and not allowing challenges this year. The bureau says it doesn't comment on litigation.

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A watchdog group has determined that some census takers who falsified information during the 2020 census didn’t have their work redone fully, weren’t fired in a timely manner and in some cases even received bonuses. The report by the U.S. Commerce Department's Office of Inspector General raises concerns about possible damage to the quality of the once-a-decade head count that determines political power and federal funding. The report released Friday also says that off-campus students at colleges and universities were likely undercounted since the census started around the same time students were sent home to stop the spread of COVID-19 in March 2020.

The House has passed legislation on a party-line vote that aims to make it harder for future presidents to interfere in the once-a-decade headcount that determines political power and federal funding. The bill is a Democrat-led response to the Trump’s administration’s failed efforts to place a citizenship question on the 2020 census. Republicans overwhelmingly opposed the bill, saying it places more power in the hands of unelected bureaucrats, reducing accountability. The 2020 census was one of the most challenging in recent memory because of the attempts at political interference, the COVID-19 pandemic and natural disasters.

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Unlike other states of the Colorado River Basin, Nevada has one main river user: Las Vegas. The world famous city in the desert is responsible for more than 90 percent of the state’s diversions, with additional water going to the Fort Mojave Indian Tribe, whose rights were recognized in a 1963 Supreme Court case, and other small water users. For decades, Las Vegas has relied on wastewater recycling and removing water-guzzling lawns to stretch and conserve its small Colorado River share. But even with proactive management, it could face significant challenges and uncertainties when it comes to future population growth.

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During the first two years of the pandemic, the number of people working from home tripled, home values grew and the percentage of people who spend more than a third of their income on rent went up. That's according to survey results released Thursday which provide the most detailed data on how life changed in the U.S. under COVID-19. The U.S. Census Bureau’s 2021 American Community Survey 1-year estimates show that the share of unmarried couples living together rose, fewer people moved, Americans became more wired, preschool enrollment dropped and the percentage of people who identify as multiracial jumped.

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The city of Boston has joined the ranks of other major cities challenging their 2020 census figures. The city claims the once-a-decade U.S. head count which determines political power and federal funding missed university students, the foreign-born and inmates at correctional facilities. Boston Mayor Michelle Wu on Tuesday said the city was challenging the census results through a special program set up by the U.S. Census Bureau for disputes over the numbers of people living in dorms, prisons, nursing homes and other group quarters where unrelated people live together. People living in group quarters were among the hardest populations to count during the tally of U.S. residents.

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Income inequality in the U.S. increased last year for the first time in more than a decade. But childhood poverty was cut almost in half due to expansion of the federal government’s child tax credit and stimulus payments made in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. That's according to new survey results released Tuesday by the U.S. Census Bureau. According to the Current Population Survey, the income inequality index increased 1.2% from 2020 to 2021, the first time the measurement known as the Gini Index has increased since 2011. Declines in household income among the poorest U.S. residents appears to have driven the income inequality.

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Democratic lawmakers are intent on making sure that unprecedented efforts by the Trump administration to politicize the 2020 census never happen again. They're proposing safeguards they say will help the U.S. head count stay free of future interference. Legislation Democratic congressmen are preparing to send to the House floor this week would put in place roadblocks against political meddling in the U.S. census, which determines political power and federal funding. Independently, the Brennan Center for Justice, a think tank, on Tuesday released recommendations that include making the U.S. Census Bureau independent of the Commerce Department which oversees the statistical agency.

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California's Imperial Valley, which provides many of the nation’s winter vegetables and cattle feed, has one of the strongest grips on water from the Colorado River, a critical but over-tapped supply for farms and cities across the West. In times of shortage, Arizona and Nevada must cut first. But even California, the nation’s most populous state with 39 million people, may be forced to give something up in the coming years as hotter and drier weather causes the river’s main reservoirs to fall to dangerously low levels. If the river were to become unusable, Southern California would lose a third of its water supply and vast swaths of farmland in the state’s southeastern desert would go unplanted.

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President Joe Biden is urging Americans to come together for a new “national purpose” — his administration’s effort to end cancer “as we know it.” At the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum, Biden on Monday channeled JFK’s famed moonshot speech 60 years ago, likening the space race to his own effort. Biden hopes to move the U.S. closer to the goal he set in February of cutting U.S. cancer fatalities by 50% over the next 25 years and dramatically improving the lives of caregivers and those suffering from cancer. Experts say the objective is attainable — with adequate investments.

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1. What school had its COVID-19 vaccine mandate upheld by the Supreme Court? A. Florida A&M University B. Indiana University C. University of Texas at Austin D. Michigan State University 2. Which racial/ethnic group saw its share of the population decline over the past decade, according to newly released Census Bureau data? A. Black B. Latino C. Asian/Pacific Islander D. White 3. Who disclosed ...

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