Wisconsin residents can't feel good about the State Senate's action this week not to confirm ag secretary Brad Pfaff. To yield to a partisan snit, as Senate Republicans obviously did, marks a sad day in Wisconsin politics, says Caffeinated Politics blogger Greg Humphrey.

Political Environment blogger James Rowen slams the Senate's action on Pfaff, but also calls out Assembly Republicans for working to weaken the governor's veto authority. Calling the GOP legislators "sore losers," Rowen points out that when Republican Scott Walker was in office, they willingly voted to give him more power at their own expense. 

The liberal advocacy group One Wisconsin Now notes how 18 Republican senators sat silently while their Majority Leader Scott Fitzgerald settled a personal beef he had with Pfaff by refusing to confirm him. OWN refers to them as "cowards," unwilling to stand up for their constituents.

Blogging Blue's Ed Heinzelman posts Politifact's take of Rep. Bryan Steil's claim that Donald Trump isn't getting the "due process" afforded both Richard Nixon and Bill Clinton during their impeachment proceedings. Steil, the fact checking service said, is wrong. The way the Nixon and Clinton proceedings were started is quite different from the current inquiry on Trump, Politifact said. 

Madison's rightie blogger David Blaska is aghast that school board members are opposed to dress codes, essentially telling students that they can wear what they want — if anything. Used to be, he says, that adults had something to teach the next generation, but school board members run shrieking away.

RightWisconsin's James Wigderson contends that there's one lesson from the Virginia election Tuesday that all should be able to agree on — claims of gerrymandering are for losers. Wigderson says that like Wisconsin, Virginia Republicans were accused of gerrymandering legislative districts and, guess what, nine years later, Democrats won.

Conservationist Charlie Mitchell, in an op-ed for Urban Milwaukee, writes that the state needs to restrict billboards.  Contending that they aren't needed in the digital age we live in, Mitchell insists that they are a blight on our scenic state. He reports on a conference exploring scenic Wisconsin. 

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