Try 1 month for 99¢
+1 
North Korea US Trump Kim Part Two?

FILE - In this July 4, 2017, file photo distributed by the North Korean government, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, second from right, inspects the preparation of the launch of a Hwasong-14 intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) in North Korea's northwest. In recent weeks it’s become clear that Donald Trump wants to meet with Kim Jong Un again, and the North Korean leader has told the White House he’d like more face-to-face talks with the American president. (Korean Central News Agency/Korea News Service via AP, File)

All that said — it's hard to stand in the way of two forceful leaders' wishes. And they seem to be wishing for a summit.

The White House press secretary recently said that a letter from Kim to Trump indicated a desire to meet again, and that plans for another summit were underway.

If that's true, why not in New York, something previously suggested by Seoul? A summit next week in Pyongyang between Kim and South Korean President Moon Jae-in, who orchestrated the Singapore summit, to the shock of maybe everyone, is seen, in part, as an attempt to set something up between Trump and Kim.

For Moon, U.S.-North Korea dialogue is crucial because he likely realizes the futility of pushing forward with his ambitious engagement plans with the North without his chief ally being on board.

Another argument for the New York possibility: Kim seems to enjoy the spotlight.

In Singapore he looked at ease before the world press, taking a late-night stroll along the city-state's beautiful shoreline, grinning as people snapped photos and called out his name. It also allows him to continue to pursue better ties, and more concessions, from Washington as he pivots from a focus on a nuclear program he claims is complete to his push to make his people prosperous — and to prolong his rule.

+1 
North Korea US Trump Kim Part Two?

FILE - In this June 12, 2018, file photo, President Donald Trump walks with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un on Sentosa Island in Singapore. In recent weeks it’s become clear that Donald Trump wants to meet with Kim Jong Un again, and the North Korean leader has told the White House he’d like more face-to-face talks with the American president. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

For Trump, a summit in his back yard might be a welcome distraction from the spiraling domestic troubles around his presidency, and allow a continuation of his argument that since Singapore was a getting-to-know-you situation, subsequent meetings would be where the real nuclear diplomacy would happen.

Of course, the problem with making any major progress on the nuclear issue beholden to the good chemistry of the leaders is that even if they meet for a second round, they may then have to keep meeting or risk seeing the process sink into a mire of inaction and bickering — which is just what seems to be happening now.

___

Foster Klug, AP's bureau chief in South Korea, has covered the Koreas since 2005. Follow him at twitter.com/apklug

Associated Press writer Eileen Putman in Washington, DC, contributed to this report.

Subscribe to Breaking News

* I understand and agree that registration on or use of this site constitutes agreement to its user agreement and privacy policy.
0
0
0
0
0