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    Roku (NASDAQ: ROKU) says selling media players is not its end game, but rather part of a strategic play to make it a competitive alternative to other streaming media services. The appearance of the Roku Channel on smart TVs made by Samsung (NASDAQOTH: SSNLF) is the first manifestation of this grand design for growth.

      It's been more than a year since Synchronoss Technologies (NASDAQ: SNCR) released earnings results. Investors have had to endure a long wait as the cloud computing specialist has gone through an extended process of restating several years' worth of the company's financials. During that period, the stock has remained depressed, having fallen initially on the news and failing to participate in the boom that has lifted so many of its peers.

        Chinese smartphone vendor Huawei has made its aspiration to be the world's leading smartphone vendor by unit shipments quite clear in recent years. The company is currently the third-largest vendor by this metric, behind second-place Apple (NASDAQ: AAPL) and first-place Samsung (NASDAQOTH: SSNLF).

          Let's be clear from the outset: there are exactly zero stocks out there you can "set and forget." Since the dawn of the Internet, the pace of change in society has only accelerated, and I don't think that will change anytime soon. As such, no incumbent is 100% safe from disruption.

            For the back-to-school shopping season, chip giant Intel (NASDAQ: INTC) is expected to roll out a new processor code-named Whiskey Lake for mainstream notebook computers. Up until now, we've known that Whiskey Lake will be manufactured on some derivative of the company's 14-nanometer technology (since Whiskey Lake is supposed to be a stopgap part while Intel prepares its more advanced Ice Lake chips built using its 10-nanometer+ technology), but the specifics of the chip haven't really been known.

              A noted worrywart placed Shopify (NYSE: SHOP) back in its crosshairs last week, turning one of last year's biggest winners into one of last week's biggest losers. Shopify stock tumbled 12.1% last week after a Citron Research piece argued that the dot-com darling is headed for a fall in light of the profile harvesting scandal at Facebook (NASDAQ: FB).

              Verizon (NYSE: VZ) reigns supreme atop the U.S. wireless industry, with more than 116 million retail connections. Yet hard-charging contender T-Mobile (NASDAQ: TMUS) has upended the industry with its innovative "Un-carrier" promotions and is rapidly gaining share.

              It was a rough debut for iQiyi (NASDAQ: IQ) last week. Baidu's (NASDAQ: BIDU) fast-growing video streaming subsidiary went public at $18 on Thursday, and it wasn't pretty. The stock opened at $18.20, far from the opening pop we've see with other hot debutantes, but still a respectable first trade. Things only got worse from there. The shares slid all day, closing at $15.55.

              Waymo, the self-driving car unit of Alphabet (NASDAQ: GOOGL) (NASDAQ: GOOG), announced this week that it would be adding as many as 20,000 Jaguars to its growing fleet of self-driving cars. Testing on the Jaguar I-PACE all-electric sport-utility vehicle would begin this year before becoming part of Waymo's fleet in 2020. Jaguar, a division of Tata Motors (NYSE: TTM), noted that Waymo was "the only company with a fleet of fully self-driving cars -- with no one in the front seat -- on public roads." Waymo said that the vehicles could combine to complete over a million trips on an average day.

              In 2014, Apple (NASDAQ: AAPL) CEO Tim Cook penned a missive regarding Apple's approach to privacy. In the letter Cook famously noted, "A few years ago, users of Internet services began to realize that when an online service is free, you're not the customer, you're the product." Cook was mostly looking to contrast the business model of Apple, which involves mostly making money on device sales, versus that of Alphabet (NASDAQ: GOOG) (NASDAQ: GOOGL), which often sells devices at breakeven to make money from advertising and data collection.

              It's fair to call Lance Priebe a legend in the world of mobile gaming, though he does not see himself that way. As the creator of Club Penguin, which he sold to Walt Disney in 2007, Priebe was a pioneer in creating a massively successful subscription-based game.

              Amazon (NASDAQ: AMZN) is much more than a retail company. Two of its fastest-growing businesses are its cloud computing service, Amazon Web Services (AWS), and its burgeoning digital advertising business. Both are bringing in billions of relatively high-margin revenue for the online retail giant, and are key to the company's overall profitability.

              Dividend stocks overall have been shown to outperform their non-dividend-paying peers, but there always seems to be a tug of war between growth and income. The allure of owning a stock in a fast-growing industry with the potential for significant gains can be tempting, as this approach can also help investors reach their financial goals. There's an opportunity, however, to get both the potential for large-scale growth while still generating an ongoing income stream.

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              According to DigiTimes, software giant Microsoft (NASDAQ: MSFT) is considering a shakeup to the way that it charges computer makers for licenses for its Windows operating system. Microsoft is reportedly going to charge computer makers more for Windows licenses for computers with higher-end specifications -- such as more advanced displays and higher memory configurations -- than for computers with lower-end specifications.

              Even though Apple (NASDAQ: AAPL) recorded record revenue and earnings per share (EPS) in the first quarter of 2018, questions remain about the company's long-term prospects.

              Over the last several years, chip giant Intel (NASDAQ: INTC) has aimed to reinvent itself as a company that's less dependent on the flat-to-declining personal computer market and more dependent on markets that are growing, like data center processors and flash memory.

              Shares of NVIDIA (NASDAQ: NVDA) recently tumbled after a double whammy of bad news. First, one of Uber's driverless vehicles, which was powered by NVIDIA's chips, hit and killed a pedestrian. Uber and NVIDIA both suspended their driverless tests after the accident.

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